Best MIDI Keyboard For FL Studio [The Top 6 Picks]

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If you’re looking for a way to get the most out of your writing process in FL Studio, then you should consider moving away from your mouse and keyboard. Moreover, you’re going to need the best MIDI keyboard for FL Studio to really improve your workflow. Well, that’s exactly what we’ll be covering in this guide.

Image-Line’s FL Studio has evolved exponentially over the years. It started out as a simple four-channel MIDI drum machine, but has since blossomed into a full-fledged Digital Audio Workstation (or DAW) that’s extremely intricate, and very powerful.

In fact, FL Studio has become one of the most widely used DAWs on the market with a passionate community of users. Not only is it the perfect DAW for beginners, but recent versions of the software (like FL Studio 20) have made efforts to further expand its fan base offering support for Apple users.

Quick Picks

ImageProductScorePrice
TOP PICK
Nektar Impact LX49+
Nektar Impact LX49+

Number of Keys: 49 — Type of Keys: Synth Action — Pads: 8 LED Backlit — Other Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel — Encoders/Pots: 8 — Faders: 8 plus volume

9.6
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BEST PAD CONTROLLER
AKAI Professional Fire
AKAI Professional Fire

Pads: 64 x RGB Pads — Velocity Sensitive: Yes — Encoders/Pots: 4 x Assignable, Touch-capacitive Knobs — Sequencer: Step Sequencer — Software: Plug and Play integration with FL Studio, FL Studio 20 Fruity Edition License

9.5
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WELL-ROUNDED
M-Audio Oxygen Pro 49
M-Audio Oxygen Pro 49

Number of Keys: 49 —Type of Keys: Semi-weighted — Pads: 16 x RGB Backlit Velocity-Sensitive Pads — Other Controllers: Pitch, Modulation Wheels — Encoders/Pots: 8 — Faders: 9

9.4
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UPGRADE PICK
AKAI Professional MPK Mini MK3
AKAI Professional MPK Mini MK3

Number of Keys: 25 — Type of Keys: Synth Mini-keys — Pads: 8 x Backlit, Velocity-sensitive Performance Pads — Other Controllers: 4-way Pitchbend/Modulation Joystick — Encoders/Pots: 8 x Assignable Knobs

9.3
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FEATURE-RICH
Alesis VI25
Alesis VI25

Number of Keys: 25 — Type of Keys: Full-size, Semi-weighted — Aftertouch: Yes — Pads: 16 x Backlit, Velocity Sensitive — Other Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel — Encoders/Pots: 8 x Knobs

9.1
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BUDGET PICK
Novation Launchkey 25
Novation Launchkey 25

Number of Keys: 25 — Type of Keys: Mini-key, Synth action — Pads: 16 x Velocity-sensitive RGB Pads — Other Controllers: Pitchbend Touch Strip, Modulation Touch Strip — Encoders/Pots: 8 x Rotary Knobs

8.9
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How To Choose The Best MIDI Keyboard For FL Studio

FL Studio was the first DAW I ever used way back in 2009, and I’m a firm believer that it’s one of the best DAWs out there. That being said, you’ll only get so far with the software without a MIDI keyboard to use with it. 

Now, It’s true that pretty much any MIDI keyboard will work with FL Studio just fine, but there are a few devices that go above and beyond. I’m talking about better integration with the software, and even specific design elements targeted at FL Studio itself.

With that in mind, let’s go over some of the factors to consider when looking for the best MIDI keyboard for FL Studio, and for your specific style of play.

Related: Ableton Vs FL Studio Guide

Type of MIDI Controller

You have a couple of different routes to go here. You can go for an instrument based MIDI keyboard with a keybed and control options, or a simple MIDI drum pad controller. In my list below, you’ll really only see MIDI keyboards listed except for one or two drum pad options. 

The reason why I’ve mainly included MIDI keyboards in the list is because they’re really the best way to level-up your writing and composition skills. Not only that, but keyboards give you even more control over certain parameters in FL Studio, especially if it has aftertouch. In any regard, the choice is up to you, and I’ve included both types of MIDI controllers in the list.

Related: MIDI Drum Pad Guide

Number of Keys

The four most popular key counts in MIDI keyboards are 25, 49, 61, and 88. In this particular case, when looking for the best MIDI keyboard for FL Studio, I’d recommend sticking to 25 or 49-key MIDI keyboards. 

The reason I say this is because those key counts are the most user-friendly in a number of ways. For one, they’re more compact and easy to fit in a home studio. For two, 25 and 49-key MIDI keyboards still give you the ability to jot down full chords without sacrificing a lot of space. Lastly, as a producer, a full-sized, 88-key MIDI keyboard might be overkill for you depending on your skill-level.

Related: 25-Key MIDI Controller Guide

Related: 49-Key MIDI Controller Guide

Key Weight

The next thing to consider is the key weight and action-type of the keybed. The vast majority of MIDI keyboard devices out there will have either synth-action or semi-weighted keys by default. Let’s talk about what that even means.

Synth-action keys are spring-loaded and have a very “light” feeling to them. These are great for beginners and players who are simply more accustomed to these types of keys.

Semi-weighted keys have a feeling that more closely resembles acoustic pianos. These types of keys are pretty much the perfect mixture of weighted keys and synth-action keys. These are probably the most favored type of keys on a MIDI keyboard.

Outside of those two key types, you’ll rarely see weighted hammer-action keys as well. These are pretty much the same thing as the keys found on acoustic pianos, but you’ll almost never see them on a MIDI keyboard.

Control Options

Seperate from the keybed, MIDI keyboards will feature a number of different control options. We’re talking about pitch and modulation wheels, drum pads, rotary knobs, faders, and transport controls (play, stop, record, etc).

Most MIDI keyboards and MIDI drum pad controllers will give you all the controls you need right out of the box, so you don’t need to go overboard with it. Just make sure the device you have your eye on has all the essentials that you need to control parameters in FL Studio.

Additional Resource: Ultimate Studio Equipment List

Connectivity & Compatibility

Most MIDI keyboards nowadays transmit data via USB, and that will be perfectly fine for most producers. All you really need to do here is make sure that the MIDI keyboard will connect to your laptop/computer with no complications. 

If you want to go the extra mile with your connectivity options, then some MIDI keyboards will offer additional inputs and outputs for you. For instance, if you want a traditional 5-pin MIDI port to connect to other hardware devices, then make sure it’s included. Also, you might want CV or Gate outputs for manipulating vintage gear or connecting to a patchbay.

Really, all you need is USB to connect to your computer, and FL Studio will handle everything from there.

Another thing to take into account is the MIDI controllers compatibility with FL Studio. Obviously, my list will only include MIDI keyboards/controllers that will work with FL Studio. If you find yourself scouring the internet elsewhere though, then double-check the devices compatibility with FL Studio.

Related: Studio Computer Guide

Power Supply

Depending on your studio setup, you may need to consider how the MIDI keyboard is powered. In most cases, these devices are powered via USB bus power through your computer. If you think you’ll spend a decent amount of time playing externally, then you may want a keyboard that’s powered by batteries or through a wall outlet.

Really, you should be fine with USB bus power, but choosing a MIDI keyboard with the added flexibility of alternative power sources isn’t a horrible idea.

Related: How To Setup A Home Recording Studio

Specific Features To Look For

As we went over before, FL Studio is an extremely powerful DAW, but it does have its own specific lane that it lives in. Even though it’s possible, FL Studio wasn’t designed to handle huge multi-track recordings in the way that Pro Tools can.

That being said, being an FL Studio producer, then you’re probably making music that falls in a few genre categories like hip-hop, trap, or EDM. Those genres are predominately made by using clips, loops, or samples. Also, those making music that fits in those genres don’t require a large number of tracks to achieve the sound you need.

All of this is just to say that you can find a MIDI keyboard that will work well for you as an FL Studio producer specifically. So, what specific features should you look for in a MIDI keyboard for FL Studio? Well, let me lay them out for you.

  • More pads – the best part about FL Studio — besides it’s piano roll — is it’s step sequencer. Certain MIDI devices like the Akai Fire are designed to look almost exactly like FL Studio’s step sequencer in the UI, and it features a lot of drum pads. In a MIDI keyboard, you can’t go wrong with a higher pad count.
  • Transport controls – like I said before, most MIDI keyboards and controllers will give you all the control options you need, but transport controls are a little more important for use with FL Studio. Transport controls are your fundamental controls such as play, pause, record, stop, etc. You absolutely need these controls for a smooth workflow in FL Studio.
  • Preconfiguration – there are a handful of MIDI keyboards that are preconfigured to work with FL Studio, and this is definitely the route to go if you think you’ll be a lifetime user of the DAW.
  • Connectivity chain support – FL Studio has the capability to connect up to 16 MIDI controllers to it with ease. As I mentioned before in the connectivity section, try to look for a MIDI keyboard that allows you to connect to other devices so you can have a chain of devices for a smooth workflow.

Again, all of the options in my list below will have these features. The main goal is to find a MIDI keyboard that will act as a physical extension of FL Studio. Choosing an option with at least a few of those features will help to make that a reality.

Let’s quickly refer back to the preconfiguration feature on that list. These are specific MIDI keyboards and controllers that are supported by Image-Line. What makes these MIDI keyboards special for using with FL Studio is the fact that they don’t require any additional configuration to work with the software out of the box. 

Here’s a glimpse at MIDI keyboards and controllers that are preconfigured to work with FL Studio:

  • M-Audio Oxygen
  • Akai MPC series
  • Novation Launchpad
  • Novation SL MKII
  • Alesis Photon X25
  • Korg KONTROL49
  • Korg Nanokey
  • Korg MS-20
  • Korg microKONTROL
  • CME UF Omnipotent

Here is a complete list of musical devices supported by Image-Line.

The list below will include a couple of these devices, but the preconfiguration aspect doesn’t mean that they’re the absolute best MIDI keyboards to use with FL Studio.

If you’re looking for more information on how to choose a MIDI keyboard, then refer to my guide below.

Related: How To Choose A MIDI Keyboard


Best MIDI Keyboard For FL Studio List

It’s about time we get into my roundup of the best MIDI keyboards for FL Studio. Remember, pretty much any MIDI keyboard nowadays will work just fine with any DAW, including FL Studio. 

The reason these keyboards are slightly better is because of their configurations, their design elements, and specific features that make the writing process in FL Studio even easier for you.


Nektar Impact LX49+

TOP PICK
9.6/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Number of Keys: 49 — Type of Keys: Synth Action — Velocity Sensitive: Yes — Pads: 8 LED Backlit — Other Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel — Encoders/Pots: 8 — Faders: 8 plus volume — Dedicated Transport Control: Yes, full integration for major DAWs — Pedal Inputs: 1 x 1/4" (assignable) — MIDI I/O: USB — USB: 1 x Type B — Computer Connectivity: USB — Software: Bitwig 8-Track (VST plug-in compatible) — OS Requirements - Mac: OS X 10.7 or later, iOS (Apple Camera Connection kit required for iPad) — OS Requirements - PC: Windows 7 or later — Height: 3.00" — Width: 31.60" — Depth: 10.50" — Weight: 7.0 lbs.

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Custom FL Studio integration

+ Lots of control options

+ Affordable

Reasons To Avoid:

- No MIDI ports

9.6out of 10

Build Quality9.6
Key Feel9.4
Features9.7

Taking the top spot is a MIDI keyboard that features custom integration with FL Studio out of the box. The Nektar Impact LX49+ is the one version I decided to include in the list because it’s a perfect compromise between all of the sizes. 

That being said, any of the LX+ Series MIDI keyboards would be a great choice to use with FL Studio. If I had to make a solid recommendation though, I’d say the 25-key and 49-key options will probably suit you best. Any bigger than that and the Impact keyboards start to get pretty bulky.

Either way, the Nektar Impact LX+ line of MIDI keyboards come full of great features and are loaded with all the necessary control options. The keybed is synth-action, and though it might not be perfect, it has a good overall feel to it. 

Not only that, but these keyboards come at a price point that’s pretty wallet-friendly, especially when considering everything you get. Focusing on the LX49+, this MIDI keyboard comes with 8 backlit pads, 9 total faders, 8 rotary knobs, wheels, and all essential transport controls. 

The only wish is that there were more pads. Also, it would’ve been nice to see some MIDI ports onboard so you could connect to other pieces of studio hardware. Despite that, the pros definitely outweigh the cons with this MIDI keyboard and all others in the LX+ line.

All in all, if you’re looking for a MIDI keyboard that’s an exceptional value and integrates easily with FL Studio, then the LX+ line of keyboard controllers is the top choice. Moreover, the LX49+ MIDI keyboard sits right in the middle of the LX+ Series as an all-around great option and my pick as the best MIDI keyboard for FL Studio.


AKAI Professional Fire

BEST PAD CONTROLLER
9.5/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Pads: 64 x RGB Pads — Velocity Sensitive: Yes — Encoders/Pots: 4 x Assignable, Touch-capacitive Knobs — MIDI I/O: USB — USB: 1 x Type B — Sequencer: Step Sequencer — Software: Plug and Play integration with FL Studio, FL Studio 20 Fruity Edition License — OS Requirements - Mac: OS X 10.11 or later, FL Studio 20.0.5 or later — OS Requirements - PC: Windows 7 SP1 or later, FL Studio 20.0.5 or later — Power Supply: USB bus powered — Height: 1.69" — Width: 12.44" — Depth: 6.55" — Weight: 1.68 lbs.

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Made specifically for use with FL Studio

+ Functions as a hardware version of the sequencer in FL Studio

+ Loads of functionality

Reasons To Avoid:

- Takes a little while to get used to

9.5out of 10

Build Quality9.4
Features9.7
Ease Of Use9.5

Next up we have the one and only MIDI pad controller option on the list, and honestly one option is more than enough when it comes to this device. This is the Akai Professional Fire, and it’s a MIDI controller that is truly worthy of FL Studio. It was specifically designed to emulate FL Studio’s step sequencer, which is arguably it’s best feature.

Akai collaborated directly with Image-Line on this MIDI controller. Since it’s announcement at NAMM in 2019, the Akai Fire has continued to create waves among FL Studio users. It’s easy to see why. 

Akai and Image-Line made a MIDI controller that boasts 4×16 (64 total) backlit pads, full transport controls, an onboard Audition tool that allows you to select tracks directly on the controller, and 4 rotary knobs with various parameters to control like pan, volume, and even a high/low EQ.

The Akai Fire also comes equipped with a feature that turns the pads into a “keyboard” of sorts. It’s called Note Mode. Although the idea is cool, it doesn’t really pan out in practice unfortunately. Attempting to play keys and chords on the pads feels sloppy, and it definitely isn’t how this MIDI controller should be used.

Also, even though this controller was specifically designed for FL Studio, it will take a while for beginners to get used to using the Akai Fire. Using Audition mode also takes some time to learn, but once you do, it’s probably the best part about this device.

All in all, every inch of the Akai Fire looks and feels like it was meant for FL Studio. That fact alone makes it hard to pass on it as a great MIDI controller for FL Studio users.


M-Audio Oxygen Pro 49

WELL-ROUNDED
9.4/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Number of Keys: 49 — Type of Keys: Semi-weighted — Velocity Sensitive: Yes — Aftertouch: Yes — Pads: 16 x RGB Backlit Velocity-Sensitive Pads — Other Controllers: Pitch, Modulation Wheels — Encoders/Pots: 8 — Faders: 9 — Dedicated Transport Control: Yes — Pedal Inputs: 1 x 1/4" (sustain) — MIDI I/O: Out/USB — USB: 1 x Type B — Computer Connectivity: USB — Software: Avid Pro Tools | First M-Audio Edition, Akai MPC Beats, Ableton Live Lite, AIR Music Tech virtual instruments — Format: AAX, AU, VST — Hardware Requirements - Mac: Intel Core 2 Duo or higher (Intel Core i5 for Pro Tools | First), 4GB RAM minimum — Hardware Requirements - PC: 64-bit Intel Core 2 Duo / AMD Multi-Core or higher (Intel Core i5 for Pro Tools | First), 4GB RAM minimum — OS Requirements - Mac: OS X 10.11.6 or later (macOS 10.13.6 for Pro Tools | First) — OS Requirements - PC: Windows 7 SP1 or later (Windows 10 build 1909 for Pro Tools | First) — Power Supply: USB bus powered (cable included) — Height: 3.3" — Width: 31.5" — Depth: 10.4" — Weight: 9.3 lbs.

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Preconfigured to work with FL Studio

+ Streamlined and easy to use

+ Good for on-stage use

Reasons To Avoid:

- There's a bit of a learning curve to some of the features

9.4out of 10

Build Quality9.2
Key Feel9.3
Features9.8

M-Audio has a reputation of making very affordable music equipment, and with that comes some questions about build quality. Many of the MIDI keyboards that M-Audio puts out tend to have keys that become unusable over time. That was especially the case for their Oxygen 49 MIDI keyboard.

Well folks, I’m here to tell you that the Oxygen Pro Series of MIDI keyboards has vastly improved on the design and quality of its predecessor. Where the Oxygen Series failed with flimsy controls and keys that became stuck after long-time use, the new Oxygen Pro Series improves on overall build quality and manages to offer even more useful features.  

For example, the previous Oxygen 49 MIDI keyboard only had 8 backlit pads, and the Oxygen Pro has 16. Side note: those 16 pads on the Oxygen Pro are a pleasure to use and have a great tactile response. 

There are a number of other improvements besides the pads though. If you look at the two versions side by side, you’ll see that the Oxygen Pro MIDI keyboard has a more intuitive interface and a more attractive all around design. The Oxygen Pro has a build quality that feels a lot more reliable as well. 

For this list I chose to include the Oxygen Pro 49 as the front-runner in the series, but the Oxygen Pro 25 is a close-second for those of you who need a more compact MIDI keyboard. Also, the Oxygen Pro is fully compatible with pretty much all DAWs, including FL Studio. In fact, many users have reported that integration with FL Studio on the Oxygen Pro is smooth and seamless.


AKAI Professional MPK Mini MK3

UPGRADE PICK
9.3/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Number of Keys: 25 — Type of Keys: Synth Mini-keys — Velocity Sensitive: Yes — Pads: 8 x Backlit, Velocity-sensitive Performance Pads — Other Controllers: 4-way Pitchbend/Modulation Joystick — Encoders/Pots: 8 x Assignable Knobs — Pedal Inputs: 1 x 1/4" TS (sustain) — MIDI I/O: USB — USB: 1 x Type B — Computer Connectivity: USB — Features: Built-in Arpeggiator — Software: MPC Beats Software — OS Requirements - Mac: OS X 10.8.5 or later — OS Requirements - PC: Windows 7 SP1 or later — Power Supply: USB bus powered — Height: 1.75" — Width: 12.5" — Depth: 7.13" — Weight: 1.65 lbs.

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Top tier control options

+ Full of great features

+ Extremely versatile

Reasons To Avoid:

- Again, no MIDI output

9.3out of 10

Build Quality9.2
Key Feel9.3
Features9.5

Another option from Akai and one that’s well-known among producers everywhere. The Akai Professional MPK Mini line of MIDI keyboards are a popular first choice for people looking for an ultra-powerful and ultra-compact MIDI keyboard for laying down some tracks. 

The MPK Mini MK3 is the most recent iteration of the bunch, and it comes packed with even more controls options and an updated design.

There isn’t a massive distinction between the MKII and MK3, and either one will be a good choice for using with FL Studio. This MIDI keyboard comes with 8 of the best pads on the market. They have a great response to them, and the software that drives them helps to make them a blast to play on.

On top of that, you’ll get all the necessary transport controls, a unique joystick control for modulation and pitch, an onboard arpeggiator, and an OLED screen. You also get a robust suite of software with this MIDI keyboard that includes a number of great plugins.

The only downside to this MIDI keyboard is it’s lack of MIDI ports, but you can’t really expect that with a 25-key device like this.

At the end of the day, the Akai MPK series of MIDI keyboards are immensely popular for a reason. Their seamless integration with almost every DAW makes them even more flexible, and you won’t have any issues using the MPK Mini MK3 with FL Studio. 


Alesis VI25

FEATURE-RICH
9.1/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Number of Keys: 25 — Type of Keys: Full-size, Semi-weighted — Velocity Sensitive: Yes — Aftertouch: Yes — Pads: 16 x Backlit, Velocity Sensitive — Other Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel — Encoders/Pots: 8 x Knobs — Dedicated Transport Control: Yes — Pedal Inputs: 1 x 1/4" TS (sustain) — MIDI I/O: Out/USB — USB: 1 x Type B — Computer Connectivity: USB — Software: V Editor, Ableton Live Lite Alesis Edition, Xpand!2 — Hardware Requirements - PC: Multicore Processor, 2GB RAM minimum — OS Requirements - Mac: OS X 10.8 or later — OS Requirements - PC: Windows 7 SP1 or later — Power Supply: USB bus powered, 9V DC power supply (sold separately) — Height: 2.8" — Width: 20.9" — Depth: 10" — Weight: 7.0 lbs.

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Excellent value

+ Seamless compatibility with FL Studio

+ A surprising amount of features

Reasons To Avoid:

- The pads can stick from time to time

9.1out of 10

Build Quality9
Key Feel9.1
Features9.3

Although the Alesis V25 is the more budget-friendly option, the VI Series of MIDI keyboards simply have a lot more to offer for FL Studio users. For this article, I’ve decided to include the Alesis VI25 as the best choice, but the VI49 is worth considering if you need more keys.

This MIDI keyboard features full-sized semi-weighted keys, which is surprising to find on a 25-key design. It’s a little disappointing that the keys don’t have aftertouch, but you can’t really complain when the keys feel this great to play on.

There are also 16 backlit pads that feel pretty good to play on, even though they have a tendency to be a bit sticky and can double-trigger. That being said, 16 pads is a hard number to come by on a MIDI keyboard. In terms of using FL Studio, the more pads the better like I said earlier.

That’s not all though. The VI25 MIDI keyboard also comes with 25 assignable buttons, 8 assignable knobs, and a 5-pin MIDI Out. I’m telling you, it’s amazing to find these kinds of features on a mini MIDI keyboard like this.

What really sets this MIDI keyboard apart from the rest is it’s price-to-feature ratio. The VI25 is easily the best value on this list, and will definitely make for a good companion to use alongside FL Studio.


Novation Launchkey 25

BUDGET PICK
8.9/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Number of Keys: 25 — Type of Keys: Mini-key, Synth action — Velocity Sensitive: Yes — Pads: 16 x Velocity-sensitive RGB Pads — Other Controllers: Pitchbend Touch Strip, Modulation Touch Strip — Encoders/Pots: 8 x Rotary Knobs — Pedal Inputs: 1 x 1/4" (sustain) — MIDI I/O: 1 x 1/8" TRS Type A (Out), USB — USB: 1 x Type B — Computer Connectivity: USB — Features: Transpose, Fixed Chord, Arpeggiator — Software: Ableton Live Lite, AAS Session Bundle, Additional Bundled Plug-ins — OS Requirements - Mac: OS X 10.11.6 or later, 64-bit — OS Requirements - PC: Windows 7 SP1 or later, 64-bit — Power Supply: USB bus powered — Height: 1.22" — Width: 12.9" — Depth: 6.77" — Weight: 1.55 lbs.

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Simple and easy to use

+ Plenty of controls and pads

+ Keybed feels quite good

Reasons To Avoid:

- Some components feel flimsy

8.9out of 10

Build Quality8.7
Key Feel9
Features9.1

Last but not least we have a MIDI keyboard that’s made to use with Ableton Live, but still sees plenty of love from FL Studio users. The Novation Launchkey line of MIDI keyboards are all made to be affordable without skimping on features, and the 25-key version is a great match for FL Studio.

Although the 49-key option is still great, it has a pretty large footprint. The Novation Launchkey 25 comes with the same control options as the 49-key, and it all comes in a smaller package. Most importantly, the Launchkey 25 MIDI keyboard still offers a total of 16 backlit pads, making it ideal for FL Studio users.

The keybed is made up of synth-action mini keys, which might be too small for some of you. This MIDI keyboard comes with an adequate amount of control options as well such as transport controls, 8 rotary knobs, transpose buttons, and mod/pitch wheels.

Overall, the Launchkey 25 MIDI keyboard is made to be a budget-friendly device. With that, some components do feel a little bit flimsy and cheaply made. I’m mainly talking about the knobs and wheels here, but the keys do feel a bit hollow as well. Really though, just be careful with this MIDI keyboard seeing as it’s pretty fragile. Despite that, the pads are pretty responsive, even if they feel a bit stiff to play on. 

The Novation Launchkey 25 MIDI keyboard is the most affordable option on this list. Therefore, if you’re on a budget and you’re looking for a good mini MIDI keyboard for FL Studio, then this is a solid option for you.

Conclusion

That’s it guys! That’s the list to help you pick the best MIDI keyboard for FL Studio. As I said at the beginning, pretty much any MIDI keyboard will work fine with FL Studio. That being said, the keyboards on this list have a few distinct features that give them a slight advantage over other MIDI keyboard options out there.

With that in mind, the top choice for best MIDI keyboard for FL Studio has to go to the Nektar Impact LX49+, but really the entire LX+ Series of keyboards are fantastic. It has all the control options you could ever need and it also features custom integration for FL Studio. Not too shabby!

I hope this guide has helped you in your research of the best MIDI keyboards for FL Studio. If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out.

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Jeremy Bongiorno
I have been a musician and producer for over 15 years. My goal is to provide reliable, honest information and hopefully help to improve the quality of life in your studio.

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