Best MIDI Keyboard For Ableton Live [The Top 6 Picks For 2022]

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When I first made the switch from FL Studio to Ableton Live, I noticed a drastic change in my overall workflow. This revelation made me understand why Ableton is such a popular DAW for producers of all backgrounds. After getting familiar with the software, my next big step was to find the best MIDI keyboard for Ableton Live to further improve my music-making capabilities.

Finding the best Ableton controller is a bit of a task, and I can understand why you’re here seeking more information as you do your research. Fortunately for you, this article will go over everything related to MIDI controller keyboards that pair well with Ableton.

The best MIDI keyboards for Ableton Live will have features that coincide with the DAW, making your writing and tracking processes easier. What you’re looking for is a way to keep your hands on your keyboard as much as possible without having to interrupt your creative flow.

Quick Picks

ImageProductScorePrice
TOP PICK
Novation 61SL MkIII
Novation 61SL MkIII

Number of Keys: 61 — Type of Keys: Semi-weighted — Aftertouch: Yes — Pads: 16 x RGB Backlit Pads — Other Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel — Encoders/Pots: 8 x Continuous Rotary Knobs — Faders: 8

9.7
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RUNNER-UP
Novation Launchkey 49 MK3
Novation Launchkey 49 MK3

Number of Keys: 49 — Type of Keys: Synth action — Pads: 16 x RGB, Velocity-sensitive Pads — Other Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel — Encoders/Pots: 8 x Rotary Knobs — Faders: 9 x 45mm Faders

9.6
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UPGRADE PICK
AKAI Professional MPK261
AKAI Professional MPK261

Number of Keys: 61 — Type of Keys: Semi-weighted — Pads: 16 — Other Controllers: 8 x Assignable Buttons, Mod, Pitch Wheels — Encoders/Pots: 8 — Faders: 8

9.5
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COMPACT & PORTABLE
Novation Launchkey 25 MK3
Novation Launchkey 25 MK3

Number of Keys: 25 — Type of Keys: Synth action — Pads: 16 x RGB, Velocity-sensitive Pads — Other Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel — Encoders/Pots: 8 x Rotary Knobs

9.4
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WELL-ROUNDED
M-Audio Oxygen Pro 49
M-Audio Oxygen Pro 49

Number of Keys: 49 — Type of Keys: Semi-weighted — Pads: 16 x RGB Backlit Velocity-Sensitive Pads — Other Controllers: Pitch, Modulation Wheels — Encoders/Pots: 8 — Faders: 9

9.3
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BUDGET PICK
Alesis VI61
Alesis VI61

Number of Keys: 61 — Type of Keys: Full-size, Semi-weighted — Pads: 16 x RGB Backlit Pads — Other Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel — Encoders/Pots: 16 x Knobs

9.2
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Factors To Consider Before Buying A MIDI Keyboard For Ableton Live

Now, there are a slew of options to choose from out there. Before we get into my list of best MIDI keyboards for Ableton, we need to take a look at all of the factors to consider before purchasing.

Number Of Keys

First and foremost, it’s important to determine how many keys you need on your new keyboard for Ableton Live. A lot of this is dependent on your skill level and what you plan on doing with your keyboard.

For example, if you are more of a novice player and you’re just looking for a way to jot down ideas and let your inspirations flow with ease, then a smaller keyboard might be more beneficial. Something like 25-keys should suffice. This size of keyboard is great for beat-makers and producers who mainly create catchy loops.

Alternatively, if you’re looking for a way to write full-scale chord progressions with real-time drum sequences, then a larger keyboard with loads of control options might be the best route to go. Look for a keyboard with 49 to 88 keys in this case. This size of keyboard is more suitable for writing entire songs with many complex layers. Keep in mind that the bigger the keyboard, the more likely it is that you’ll need keyboard stand.

Like I said, this is all dependent on what you need for your specific workflow.

Drum Pad Or MIDI Keyboard

Ableton Live has an awesome stock plugin called “Drum Rack” that acts as a virtual drum sequencer. You can drop in a large number of samples and map each one to a specific note. From there, once you have everything set up, you can then play those samples seamlessly based on how you mapped them.

Drum Rack is an easy way to quickly track drums, but it also allows you to map any sample you can think of. You’re not limited to just percussion samples by any means. 

Now, a great way to utilize Drum Rack is with a hardware MIDI drum pad. As you can see in the picture above, the UI of the plugin is similar to the layout of a drum pad controller. Both the plugin and the hardware will work in harmony together. This is a great way to improve your creative process even further.

Ableton makes a wonderful MIDI controller called “Ableton Push” that’s specifically designed for use with the software. All of the control options are seamlessly mapped to the DAW and there are more than enough pads onboard.

The choice is up to you. For the sake of this article, we’ll be focusing primarily on MIDI controller keyboards though, so be sure to give yourself plenty of onboard pads to use with Drum Rack and other great Ableton features.

Control Options (Pads, Knobs, Faders, Wheels, Etc.)

The next factor to consider is how many control options you need. The essential transport controls are always included on a MIDI keyboard. I’m talking about play, stop, and record buttons. 

Outside of that, there are a number of useful controls to look for on a keyboard that you’ll use with Ableton specifically. For example, both a pitch wheel and modulation wheel are definitely a necessity. 

Of all the things that Ableton does great, pitch bending and modulation are a bit complicated to accomplish in real-time on the software. That’s why it’s great to have a keyboard that can do these tasks on-the-fly with ease.

On top of that, make sure to give yourself plenty of faders and knobs. Ableton Live’s “Session View” is perfect for live performances. All of your tracks are laid out like a virtual mixing console in Session View, and can be easily manipulated with knobs and faders on a keyboard controller if mapped correctly. 

All in all, Ableton has a lot of parameters that can be controlled, so find a keyboard to match that level of control.

Ableton is one of the best DAWs for both live performances, and at-home recording/tracking. Finding a MIDI keyboard that’s great at both of those jobs as well will be a worthy companion to the software.

Key Weight

The keybed itself is the next thing to consider when looking for the best keyboard for Ableton Live. This is almost entirely dependent on what you’re used to playing. If you come from a background of playing on classical pianos, then you might need semi-weighted keys. 

Conversely, if you’ve mainly played on digital pianos, then you should be comfortable with regular old synth-action keys.

Most MIDI keyboards have “synth-action” keybeds, which are great for beginners and players that are used to that key weight. They are usually tactile and responsive enough for pretty much any scenario. 

Semi-weighted keyboards are a treat to play on. They are ultra-responsive and have a key feel that’s closer to that of a classical piano, but they’re still not as close to the real thing as a fully-weighted MIDI keyboard.

The choice is yours though. Just keep in mind that you’re going to be spending a lot of time writing music on your new keyboard controller, so it’s imperative to choose what’s most comfortable to you.

Connectivity & Ableton Live Integration

Last but not least, it goes without saying that you need to find a keyboard controller that’s compatible with Ableton Live. While it’s true that pretty much all MIDI keyboards are compatible with most of the popular DAWs on the market, some of them will be easier to integrate with Ableton specifically.

Also, try to find a MIDI controller keyboard that has the right connectivity options for your computer and other external devices. Most keyboards nowadays transmit data via USB MIDI, and that’s usually how they will connect to your computer as well. In most cases, this is all you’ll need.

If you want to expand your connectivity, then you’ll need to go a bit farther. 5-pin MIDI ports are great for connecting to other external devices such as a hardware synth. Also, CV or Gate outputs are great for connecting to a patchbay. All of this is dependent on what you need in your specific studio setup.

Specific Features To Look For

Ableton Live is a very capable DAW. As I mentioned earlier, it’s great for both live performances and for general recording/tracking at home. Although it’s not quite up to the level of Pro Tools for recording, it’s perfect for those of you that mainly make music that falls in a certain category. Hip-hop, EDM, Synthwave, and Future Bass producers love using Ableton as their main DAW.

That being said, finding a keyboard that can keep up with Ableton requires a few specific features to be present on the device. Here’s a quick list of specific things to be on the lookout for in a keyboard or drum pad controller to pair with Ableton:

  • Arpeggiator – An onboard arpeggiator is a nice feature to have on a MIDI keyboard controller for Ableton. The DAW comes with an arpeggiator plugin that can be used with external devices as well, but having both can be a great combo when flowing in Ableton.
  • Plenty of pads – I touched on this earlier, but it’s helpful to have plenty of drum pads on your keyboard if you decide to go that route instead of a dedicated MIDI drum pad device. Certain stock Ableton plugins like Drum Rack are particularly great to use with a MIDI controller of any kind. My point is that you shouldn’t limit yourself in terms of button pads.
  • Loads of onboard controls – we went over this earlier as well, but be sure to give yourself a lot of extended control options on your keyboard. Ableton’s Session View is specifically designed for live performances or real-time recording tasks. Having a lot of faders, knobs, and all the necessary transport controls will surely make using Ableton even easier.
  • High-quality keybed – the one major downside to Ableton Live is it’s piano roll. When comparing it to FL Studio or Logic Pro, this is one feature that falls short. That’s why it’s important to have a keyboard that has a solid keybed so you can make up for the subpar piano roll that Ableton offers. Key weight and the overall quality of the keys both play a part in this.

Best MIDI Keyboard For Ableton List

Now that you have an idea of the important factors to consider, it’s time to look at my list of the best MIDI keyboards for Ableton Live. These MIDI controller keyboards check all the boxes in terms of features, specs, and compatibility with the DAW.  

With that in mind, let’s get into the list.


Novation 61SL MkIII

TOP PICK
9.7/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Number of Keys: 61 — Type of Keys: Semi-weighted — Velocity Sensitive: Yes — Aftertouch: Yes — Pads: 16 x RGB Backlit Pads — Other Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel — Encoders/Pots: 8 x Continuous Rotary Knobs — Faders: 8 — Dedicated Transport Control: Yes — Sequencer: 64 Sessions, 8 Tracks per Session, 8 Patterns per Track, Unquantized Recording, Micro-step Editing — Pedal Inputs: 1 x 1/4" (expression), 1 x 1/4" (sustain), 1 x 1/4" (footswitch) — MIDI I/O: In, Out, Out2/Thru, USB — USB: 1 x Type B — Other I/O: 1 x Clock out, 2 x CV out, 2 x Mod out, 2 x Gate out — Computer Connectivity: USB — Software: Ableton Live Lite, 4GB Loopmaster Sounds and Samples — OS Requirements - Mac: OS X 10.11.6 or later — OS Requirements - PC: Windows 7 SP1 or later — Power Supply: 12V DC power supply (included) — Height: 3.93" — Width: 38.62" — Depth: 11.81"

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Deep integration with Ableton

+ Excellent amount of control options

+ Feature-rich

Reasons To Avoid:

- Expensive

9.7out of 10

Build Quality9.7
Key Feel9.6
Features9.9

Not to be confused with the Launchkey line of MIDI keyboards from Novation, the SL MKII is a premium device that was designed almost exclusively for Ableton Live. In fact, Novation is a company known for making Ableton-specific keyboards, and this option in particular truly shines above the rest.

The SL series comes in either 61-key or 49-key versions, but I figured that 61 keys would be more of a universal option for you guys. Since we’re on the topic, the keybed features semi-weighted full-sized keys as well. The keybed has a great feel to it and intermediate and experienced players alike should feel right at home on it.

The Novation SL61 MKII keyboard controller does come with more than enough control options and it’s loaded with great features that Ableton users should find very useful. Let me lay a few of those features out. So, there is an onboard 8-track sequencer, customizable templates, and even an arpeggiator. 

On top of that, this keyboard offers a lot in terms of connectivity options. You get CV/Gate ports for connecting external synths, MIDI I/O’s, and even an Analog Clock output. You get the idea. 

All in all, this is an ultra-premium keyboard for serious Ableton producers, and it’s the clear winner on this list in my eyes. If you’re looking for the best of the best to pair with your DAW, then look no further than the SL61 MKIII.


Novation Launchkey 49 MK3

RUNNER-UP
9.6/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Number of Keys: 49 — Type of Keys: Synth action — Velocity Sensitive: Yes — Pads: 16 x RGB, Velocity-sensitive Pads — Other Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel — Encoders/Pots: 8 x Rotary Knobs — Faders: 9 x 45mm Faders — Dedicated Transport Control: Play, Stop, Record, Loop — Pedal Inputs: 1 x 1/4" (sustain) — MIDI I/O: Out/USB — USB: 1 x Type B — Computer Connectivity: USB — Features: Scale Modes, Chord Modes, Arpeggiator — Software: Ableton Live Lite, Virtual Instrument and Sample Plug-in Bundle — OS Requirements - Mac: OS X 10.11 or later — OS Requirements - PC: Windows 7 SP1 or later — Power Supply: USB Bus powered — Height: 3.03" — Width: 31.06" — Depth: 10.16" — Weight: 6.68 lbs.

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Seamless Ableton Live Integration

+ Plenty of control options

+ Fair and affordable price point

Reasons To Avoid:

- Key feel might not be suitable for every player

9.6out of 10

Build Quality9.5
Key Feel9.4
Features9.8

The Novation Launchkey series are definitely among the most popular MIDI controllers for Ableton. They are affordable and easily integrate with the DAW. They also offer a lot of great features and a good amount of control options. You always get a good bang-for-your-buck value with these MIDI keyboards, and the newest version is no exception.

The MK3 marks the newest addition to the Launchkey line. This time Novation added larger velocity-sensitive pads, an onboard arp, more control options, and a MIDI output. There are a few other additions to this generation, but those are the ones that stand out above the rest.

In terms of the keybed, the 49-key version comes with velocity-sensitive synth-action keys. No, these aren’t the best keys you’ll ever play on, but they are still quite responsive and should suit the needs of most at-home producers.

These keyboards are widely popular for a reason. Everything you could ever need to start making music with Ableton is available and at our fingertips. You get a keyboard that was made for your DAW of choice, and making beats on this device is about as easy as it gets.


AKAI Professional MPK261

UPGRADE PICK
9.5/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Number of Keys: 61 — Type of Keys: Semi-weighted — Velocity Sensitive: Pressure and Velocity-sensitive pads — Aftertouch: Yes — Pads: 16 — Other Controllers: 8 x Assignable Buttons, Mod, Pitch Wheels — Encoders/Pots: 8 — Faders: 8 — Dedicated Transport Control: Yes — Pedal Inputs: 1 x Sustain, 1 x Expression — MIDI I/O: In/Out/USB/iOS — USB: 1 x Type B — Computer Connectivity: USB — Software: VIP3.0 (free download) — Hardware Requirements - Mac: 1.25 GHz G4/G5 or Faster (Intel Recommended), 2GB RAM — Hardware Requirements - PC: 1.5 GHz Pentium 4 or Celeron CPU, 2GB RAM, Windows-compatible Sound Card — OS Requirements - Mac: OS X 10.7 or Later — OS Requirements - PC: Windows 7 SP1 or later — Power Supply: Bus Powered — Height: 3.38" — Width: 35.63" — Depth: 12.25" — Weight: 15.1 lbs.

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Easily integrates with Ableton

+ Loaded with control options

+ Semi-weighted keybed

Reasons To Avoid:

- A little pricey

9.5out of 10

Build Quality9.4
Key Feel9.5
Features9.7

Next up we have yet another extremely popular MIDI keyboard. The Akai Professional MPK261 is a universal favorite among users of all DAWs, but it excels in a few key areas for Ableton Live. It integrates very well with the DAW and it gives you a multitude of options for controlling it.

There are quite a few options to choose from in the MPK line of MIDI controllers. I chose the MPK261 as the best choice for Ableton, but you can just as easily opt for the MPK Mini or the MPK249 if you don’t need 61 keys.

The keybed features 61 velocity-sensitive, full-sized keys that are semi-weighted. This particular keybed is a pleasure to play on due to it’s tight and responsive nature. The MPC-style pads are also exceptionally fun to use and they’re very easy to map.

You also get a total of 24 assignable Q-Link controllers across 8 faders, 8 knobs, and 8 switches. You also get a number of MPC tools such as MPC Note Repeat, arpeggiator, MPC Full Level, Tap Tempo and Time Divisions. 

On top of everything, you also get an excellent suite of bundled software with this MIDI keyboard. The list includes Ableton Live Lite, Hybrid 3 by AIR Music Tech and SONiVOX Twist 2.0. 

All of this does come with a hefty price-tag attached to it, but that’s somewhat expected. Again, this is a top-tier keyboard that’s sure to improve your workflow and allow your creativity to flourish. 

There’s a reason why the Akai MPK series of MIDI controllers are so highly regarded, and it makes a great addition to the already powerful Ableton software.


Novation Launchkey 25 MK3

COMPACT & PORTABLE
9.4/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Number of Keys: 25 — Type of Keys: Synth action — Velocity Sensitive: Yes — Pads: 16 x RGB, Velocity-sensitive Pads — Other Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel — Encoders/Pots: 8 x Rotary Knobs — Dedicated Transport Control: Play, Stop, Record, Loop — Pedal Inputs: 1 x 1/4" (sustain) — MIDI I/O: Out/USB — USB: 1 x Type B — Computer Connectivity: USB — Features: Scale Modes, Chord Modes, Arpeggiator — Software: Ableton Live Lite, Virtual Instrument and Sample Plug-in Bundle — OS Requirements - Mac: OS X 10.11 or later — OS Requirements - PC: Windows 7 SP1 or later — Power Supply: USB Bus powered — Height: 3.03" — Width: 18.23" — Depth: 10.16" — Weight: 3.99 lbs.

Reasons To Buy: 

+ 16 RGB Pads

+ Stuffed with great features

+ Loads of control options

Reasons To Avoid:

- Some players might not like the slim keys

9.4out of 10

Build Quality9.4
Key Feel9.3
Features9.6

The Novation Launchkey 25 is a perfect choice for those of you that are looking for a lightweight, portable, and compact MIDI keyboard. If you just need a keyboard to break out and lay down some tracks on, then this is an excellent choice.

Once again, this MIDI controller keyboard option comes from Novation, so you know that it will integrate very easily with Ableton. This is essentially the same keyboard as the Launchkey 49 MK3 from earlier, but with 25 keys instead. This gives it a much smaller footprint and makes it easier to store. Also, a keyboard of this size is great for taking on the road should you need to.

The reason I decided to include the Launchkey 25 MK3 instead of the Launchkey Mini MK3 is due to the keybed. The Mini MK3 has stubby little mini keys that might not be suitable for most players. To be fair, the Launchkey 25 MK3 has keys that are pretty slim, but they are at least marginally better than the mini keybed.

Also, the Launchkey 25 keyboard gives you more control options than the Mini. Overall, the Launchkey 25 is simply more of a well-rounded option. You get the compact size and most of the bells and whistles that the bigger versions have. Plus, it comes at a price that won’t break the bank.


M-Audio Oxygen Pro 49

WELL-ROUNDED
9.3/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Number of Keys: 49 — Type of Keys: Semi-weighted — Velocity Sensitive: Yes — Aftertouch: Yes — Pads: 16 x RGB Backlit Velocity-Sensitive Pads — Other Controllers: Pitch, Modulation Wheels — Encoders/Pots: 8 — Faders: 9 — Dedicated Transport Control: Yes — Pedal Inputs: 1 x 1/4" (sustain) — MIDI I/O: Out/USB — USB: 1 x Type B — Computer Connectivity: USB — Software: Akai MPC Beats, Ableton Live Lite, AIR Music Tech virtual instruments — Format: AAX, AU, VST — Hardware Requirements - Mac: Intel Core 2 Duo or higher (Intel Core i5 for Pro Tools | First), 4GB RAM minimum — Hardware Requirements - PC: 64-bit Intel Core 2 Duo / AMD Multi-Core or higher (Intel Core i5 for Pro Tools | First), 4GB RAM minimum — OS Requirements - Mac: OS X 10.11.6 or later (macOS 10.13.6 for Pro Tools | First) — OS Requirements - PC: Windows 7 SP1 or later (Windows 10 build 1909 for Pro Tools | First) — Power Supply: USB bus powered (cable included) — Height: 3.3" — Width: 31.5" — Depth: 10.4" — Weight: 9.3 lbs.

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Easily integrates with most DAWs, including Ableton

+ Equipped with a lot of onboard controls

+ Includes some unique features

Reasons To Avoid:

- Takes time to get used to

9.3out of 10

Build Quality9.3
Key Feel9.2
Features9.5

The M-Audio Oxygen series of keyboards are another popular choice for many home recording studio producers. The newest version, the Oxygen Pro, adds a few more features that were very much needed in the previous editions.

The M-Audio Oxygen Pro series of keyboards comes in three different key counts: 25, 49, and 61. The 49-key option is the perfect middle ground for Ableton users, but the others will work just fine. Each version comes with virtually the same amount of control options and the same features.

On to the keybed. There are 49 velocity-sensitive semi-weighted keys with aftertouch. Many users report that the semi-weighted keys do feel a tad light, but are still fun to play on. 

The features on this MIDI keyboard are unique and plentiful as well. The Smart Chord and Smart Scale features in particular are pretty useful and really limit interruptions in your workflow. There is also an onboard arpeggiator, 16 RGB backlit MIDI assignable velocity sensitive drum pads with Note Repeat, 8 assignable knobs & buttons and 9 assignable faders.

M-Audio really stepped up their game with the Oxygen Pro 49 MIDI keyboard. The build quality is much improved over its predecessor and the advanced features lift this device into a higher tier. Although it’s preconfigured for FL Studio, it integrates very well with most DAWs including Ableton Live. The best part is that this keyboard is pretty affordable. 


Alesis VI61

BUDGET PICK
9.2/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Number of Keys: 61 — Type of Keys: Full-size, Semi-weighted — Velocity Sensitive: Yes — Aftertouch: Yes — Pads: 16 x RGB Backlit Pads — Other Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel — Encoders/Pots: 16 x Knobs — Dedicated Transport Control: Yes — Pedal Inputs: 1 x 1/4" (sustain) — MIDI I/O: Out — USB: 1 x Type B — Computer Connectivity: USB — Software: Ableton Live Lite, MIDI Editor — Power Supply: 9V DC power supply (sold separately) / USB bus powered — Height: 4.5" — Width: 44.1" — Depth: 12.4" — Weight: 13 lbs.

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Great price-to-performance ratio

+ Integrates well with Ableton Live

+ Excellent features for the price

Reasons To Avoid:

- Key feel and the pads can be sticky from time to time

9.2out of 10

Build Quality9.2
Key Feel9.1
Features9.4

Last but not least we have the Alesis VI61. This MIDI keyboard just might be the best value option on this list. It doesn’t sacrifice much in terms of features and comes with a healthy amount of control options. Not to mention the fact that it integrates seamlessly with Ableton Live.

The Alesis VI61 is the superior version of the popular V61. It comes with more pads, more control options, and a better overall build quality. The keybed is essentially the same though with 61 velocity-sensitive semi-weighted keys. The keys are good, even if they aren’t the best feeling keys out there.

You do get a large amount of control options on this keyboard though. The list includes 48 assignable buttons, 16 assignable knobs, and 16 backlit RGB pads. The pads themselves are responsive enough, but they do tend to stick from time to time which is actually one of my biggest gripes with this keyboard.

There are no faders included on this keyboard either. The 48 buttons somewhat make up for this, but faders would certainly be a nice addition. 

This MIDI keyboard comes with an excellent suite of included software that includes ProTools First Alesis Edition, Ableton Live Lite 9 and Eleven Lite, plus Mini Grand, DB-33 and Xpand!2 virtual instrument software by Air Music Tech.

In summary, the Alesis VI61 is an exceptional option for those of you who are on a budget. The MIDI controller  keyboard performs very well and you get a powerful external controller for Ableton. 


Conclusion – Best MIDI Keyboards For Ableton Live

Choosing the best MIDI keyboard for Ableton Live might seem like a daunting task at first. As long as you know exactly what to look for, then the decision becomes a whole lot easier.

In this case, I would say that the clear winner on this list of best MIDI controllers for Ableton is the Novation SL61 MKIII. It has everything you need to produce great music with Ableton and some. With its abundance of features and it’s plethora of connectivity options, it’s sure to be your next favorite companion in the studio. Also, the thing was basically made specifically for Ableton, so you simply can’t go wrong with it.

All of the options on this list have a lot to offer though. There’s a keyboard on this list for every budget and every playstyle out there. Not to mention the fact that each one can easily be used with Ableton Live.

I hope this article has given you some useful tips and information as you do your research. Please feel free to reach out with any questions you may have.

Author
Jeremy Bongiorno
I have been a musician and producer for over 15 years. My goal is to provide reliable, honest information and hopefully help to improve the quality of life in your studio.

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