The 6 Best Bass Traps For Home Studios In 2022 [Buyer’s Guide]

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We all know how tough it is to tame those unruly low-end frequencies in a home studio environment. What’s worse is that even after adding the right amount of acoustic panels and diffuser panels to your walls, it still won’t be enough to control those wild sound waves. That’s why finding the best bass traps is probably the most pivotal step in properly treating your studio.

Of all the tools used for acoustic treatment, corner bass traps are arguably the most important. They are an effective way to control low to mid-range frequencies and are extremely useful for eradicating standing waves, flutter echo, and early reflections. 

Now, there are a number of ways to utilize bass traps, and moreover, there is a variety of options to choose from. There is a way to make your own DIY bass traps as well, but for the sake of this article we will focus on premade options.

In this article, we will go over all the things to consider when looking at foam bass traps and fiberglass bass traps. Also give you my top picks of what’s available on the market.

Quick Picks

ImageProductScorePrice
TOP PICK
Auralex Acoustics LENRD
Auralex Acoustics LENRD

Treatment Type: Bass Traps — Number of Panels: 2, 4, 8 — Dimensions: 1' x 1' x 2' — Material: Foam

9.9
View On AmazonView At Guitar Center
RUNNER-UP
Primacoustic Broadway Max Trap
Primacoustic Broadway Max Trap

Treatment Type: Bass Traps — Number of Panels: 1 — Dimensions: 24" x 48" x 5" — Material: High-density fiberglass panel with resonator membrane

9.8
View On AmazonView At Guitar Center
BUDGET PICK
Ultimate Acoustics UA-BTBG Bass Trap
Ultimate Acoustics UA-BTBG Bass Trap

Treatment Type: Bass Traps — Number of Panels: 2 — Dimensions: 24” x 12” x 8.5" — Material: Foam

9.6
View On AmazonView At Guitar Center
VALUE PICK
Primacoustic London Bass Trap
Primacoustic London Bass Trap

Treatment Type: Absorption, Bass Trap — Number of Panels: 2 — Coverage: 24" x 48" x 2" — Construction: Fiberglass — Included Mounting Material: Anchors, Screws

9.5
View On AmazonView At Guitar Center
WELL-ROUNDED
ATS Acoustics Corner Bass Trap
ATS Acoustics Corner Bass Trap

Treatment Type: Bass Traps — Number of Panels: 1 — Coverage: 24” x 13” x 48” — Construction: 100% Jute Burlap, Plywood

9.3
View On Amazon
UNIQUE PICK
Acoustimac Bass Trap
Acoustimac Bass Trap

Treatment Type: Bass Traps — Number of Panels: 1 — Coverage: 4’ x 2’ x 4” — Construction: Plywood

9.2
View On Amazon

What Are Bass Traps?

Bass traps are used for acoustic treatment in a home studio, semi-pro studio, or professional studio space. They are typically made of foam or fiberglass and are made to fit in the corners of a room. 

Of the two main forms, foam bass traps are the most cost effective and are the easiest to install. This makes them the most popular option. Foam bass traps are sometimes referred to as “porous absorber” traps.

Related: Studio Equipment List: The Top 50 Essentials

Fiberglass bass traps (otherwise known as “resonant absorber” traps) are similar to broadband absorber panels, but are specially designed for absorbing bass frequencies. These options usually come with a higher price-tag, but their performance is top notch.

You can’t really go wrong with either option, especially when you consider that a lot of what makes bass traps effective is how you place them. We will go over that later on though.

Related: Ultimate Acoustic Treatment Guide

Bass Traps Vs. Acoustic Panels

You wouldn’t be reading this article if you haven’t already been reading up on the subject of acoustic treatment as a whole. To that point, it’s fair to point out the distinct differences between bass traps and acoustic panels.

Both tools are used for absorbing sound, but their core difference is in design. Firstly, acoustic panels are flat and are commonly about 2-inches thick. Bass traps are usually twice as thick as acoustic panels and have a trihedral design.

This thicker design helps bass traps in their quest to absorb low frequencies. Acoustic panels are most effective at absorbing frequencies above 1 kHz. Everything below that should be left to a good set of bass traps.

Related: Acoustic Panels Guide

Benefits Of Bass Traps For Home Studios

Corner bass traps go hand in hand with other acoustic treatment tools such as acoustic panels and diffuser panels. I have gone over the topic of acoustic treatment and even acoustic panels in other articles, so head over to either one to learn more!

When talking about bass traps specifically, we’re looking at the most troublesome frequencies of all: lows and mids. Bass traps are designed to absorb those sound waves and stop them from bouncing from wall to wall. Not only that, but they also help to absorb resonant frequencies from finding a home in the corners of your room, which ultimately leads to standing waves.

Really though, there is a large list of benefits that come from adding bass traps to corners of your studio. Let me lay some of those out for you:

  • Less muddiness and a better overall sound quality in your studio.
  • Better monitoring potential from your studio monitors and studio subwoofer.
  • They help to create a more reliable environment for recording, mixing, and playback.
  • Standing waves, flutter echo, and room nodes are all drastically reduced.

I could go on and on, but it’s pretty clear why bass traps for home recording are a necessity.

Related: 9-Step Home Recording Studio Setup Guide

Additional Resource: Studio Microphones Guide

How Do Bass Traps Work?

Without getting too terribly technical, bass traps work by generating friction between the sound waves and the absorbing material that the trap is made of. When there’s friction, there’s heat, and heat helps to reduce the intensity of low frequency sound waves.

All of this helps to reduce vibrations, echoes, and reverberations. In the end, you get a properly treated studio that will ultimately make your life a whole lot easier.

Additional Resource: Studio Monitors Guide

Bass Trap Placement

Treating your ceiling and walls with acoustic panels is a huge step in improving the overall sound quality and recording quality in your studio. That being said, the biggest problem area in any studio resides in the corners of the room.

Well, lucky for you, that’s exactly where bass traps are meant to go. By placing acoustic bass traps in all of the corners of your studio space, you’re getting the highest level of effectiveness out of them.

It’s even a good idea to treat the top corners of your room with bass traps as well. Most people only think of the four corners on the floor, but your ceiling is just as important. As a general rule of thumb, go for quantity over quality with bass traps, especially when talking about foam ones. As you multiply the amount of bass traps you add to each corner of our room, you’re effectively absorbing more of those bass frequencies.

Again, the more the better.

Additional Resource: Monitor Isolation Pads Guide

Additional Resource: Portable Vocal Booth Guide

How Many Bass Traps Do You Need?

Given what I just mentioned, you’re likely going to need 8 total bass traps for each of the trihedral corners of your studio space. 

If you’re on a budget then you can start out with treating the corners adjacent to your studio desk. In that case you’d only need 4 corner bass traps.

NRC Rating

NRC stands for Noise Reduction Coefficient, which is used to give future-users an idea of the effectiveness of sound absorption products. This measurement is given on a 0 to 1 scale. For example, if the NRC rating of a particular set of bass traps is 0.75, that means that it is capable of absorbing 75% of the noise it encounters.

What’s interesting about the NRC rating on bass traps in particular is that the 0 to 1 scale is stretched. Some options will have an NRC of 1.5 for instance, which is meant to showcase the superior absorption capabilities of these products.

Keep in mind that not every manufacturer will indicate the NRC rating of their product. Also, this rating should be taken as a reference that’s meant to give you an idea of the product’s effectiveness. Try not to get too caught up on this number.

Additional Resource: Studio Subwoofer Guide

Additional Resource: Overhead Drum Mics Guide


Best Bass Traps List

Now that we’ve covered the important stuff, it’s time to get into my list of the best bass traps on the market today. You’ll see a few different forms on the list including acoustic foam bass traps, broadband absorber bass panels, and wooden block-type panels. This is just to give you plenty of options to choose from.


Auralex Acoustics LENRD

TOP PICK
9.9/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Treatment Type: Bass Traps — Number of Panels: 2, 4, 8 — Dimensions: 1' x 1' x 2' — Material: Foam

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Top-notch bass absorption

+ Easy to use

+ Simple design

Reasons To Avoid:

- None

9.9out of 10

Materials9.9
Installation9.8
Sound Diffusion10

Taking the top spot is a set of bass traps from Auralex Acoustics called LENRD, meaning “Low End Node Reduction Device.” Auralex is a top tier player in the soundproofing and acoustic treatment field. Their acoustic panels are one of the best options on the market, and this acoustic foam bass trap set is in the same realm.

This particular pack comes with 4 acoustic foam bass traps and each one has a measurement of 12” x 12” x 24”, which is more than adequate for most home recording studios. If you want to go the extra mile and cover the corners on your ceiling, then you can easily buy two sets for full coverage.

The NRC ratings of the Auralex Acoustics LENRD bass traps is a whopping 1.5, so no worries in that department. In fact, they’ve been proven to absorb frequencies as low as 75 Hz. This makes them perfect for taming those unruly low frequencies in your studio environment.

All in all, we’re looking at one of the best performing options on this list. Not only that, but the Auralex LENRD bass traps are probably the top choice on the market today due to their effectiveness and simple design. They do come with a hefty price-tag, but their performance alone makes it more than worth it. 


Primacoustic Broadway Max Trap

RUNNER-UP
9.8/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Treatment Type: Bass Traps — Number of Panels: 1 — Dimensions: 24" x 48" x 5" — Material: High-density fiberglass panel with resonator membrane

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Absorbs bass frequencies extremely well

+ 3-way broadband design

+ Effective from 65 Hz and up

Reasons To Avoid:

- Pricey

9.8out of 10

Materials9.8
Installation9.6
Sound Diffusion10

The runner-up on this list of best bass traps is the Broadway Max from Primacoustic. This option is basically an acoustic panel/bass trap hybrid. It can absorb highs and mids 

This panel has a 3-way system, almost like a 3-way speaker, but in reverse. First, high frequencies are absorbed with a fabric covered fiberglass panel that measures 3-inches in thickness. Behind that panel is an open air space that’s 16-inches thick that’s meant to reduce low-mids and high-lows. Lastly, there is a heavy, dead mass in the form of a diaphragmatic membrane which absorbs deep bass frequencies down to 65 Hz.

This bass panel has seen use in professional studios throughout the world, and it’s easy to see why. The 3-way system is extremely effective. 

Let’s talk about measurements now. Each panel is 24″ x 48″ and the frame is made of wood. Primacoustic markets this bass panel to be easy to mount, but that’s assuming that you have some DIY handy-man skills. Either way, it’ll be a bit of a process getting this thing mounted properly.

Each bass panel is sold separately, and each one is very expensive. Also, mounting these bad boys is no small task. Those are just some of the sacrifices that come from this level of performance though. With that, if you’re looking for an ultra-premium bass trap, then the Primacoustic Broadway Max is the way to go. 


Ultimate Acoustics UA-BTBG Bass Trap

BUDGET PICK
9.6/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Treatment Type: Bass Traps — Number of Panels: 2 — Dimensions: 24” x 12” x 8.5" — Material: Foam

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Easy mounting and placement

+ Decent low frequency absorption

+ Unique design

Reasons To Avoid:

- Foam performance doesn’t quite match the LENRD

9.6out of 10

Materials9.6
Installation9.5
Sound Diffusion9.7

This acoustic foam bass trap pair has become a popular choice for producers on a budget. They don’t come with as heavy a price-tag as other options, and yet they still perform quite well.

To be fair, even though they’re cheaper, they are nowhere near as capable as the other acoustic foam bass trap option on this list: the Auralex LENRD. These are meant to be an affordable set of acoustic foam bass traps that absorb bass frequencies. That being said, don’t expect them to exceed expectations.

Now, this foam bass trap pair will do just fine for most simple home studio setups. The NRC rating isn’t listed, but the high-density foam is well-made and definitely makes a difference in terms of room nodes and low frequency rumbles.

Each acoustic foam bass trap measures at 24” x 12” x 8.5″ and are sold in pairs. Each pair of bass traps also comes with adhesive squares for mounting and placement. There are reports of the adhesive squares not working properly though, so you may have to find an alternative.

Ultimate Acoustics also has a great mobile app that you can use to analyze your room. The app takes the exact parameters of your room and gives you suggestions of how many panels/bass traps to use and where to use them. It’s an all-around great tool to use for acoustic treatment in any studio environment. The best part is that the app is free to use and it pairs great with any Ultimate Acoustics brand product.


Primacoustic London Bass Trap

VALUE PICK
9.5/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Treatment Type: Absorption, Bass Trap — Number of Panels: 2 — Coverage: 24" x 48" x 2" — Construction: Fiberglass — Included Mounting Material: Anchors, Screws

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Effective down to 100 Hz

+ Includes mounting hardware

+ Good value

Reasons To Avoid:

- Might not fit well in certain studios

9.5out of 10

Materials9.7
Installation9.3
Sound Diffusion9.6

Next up we have yet another option from Primacoustic. These bass traps are a part of the acoustic panel starter kit line called “London,” and they are sold in some of the bundles. In this case, we’re looking at the bass traps individually and here they can be bought separately.

These bass traps are another broadband absorber option, meaning that they aren’t made of foam. These particular bass traps don’t feature the 3-way system seen in the previous Primacoustic model, but they are more affordable and still quite effective.

In fact, these bass trap panels are capable of absorbing frequencies as low as 100 Hz, and when more panels are used, the effectiveness is multiplied. Each panel measures out to be 24″ x 48″ x 2″ and are sold in sets of 2.

Each panel is constructed from high-density 6lb glass wool with resin hardened edges and fully encapsulated with micromesh. Each bass trap panel is also wrapped in a polyester fabric in varying colors so you can pick the ones that will look the best in your studio.

The only downside to these acoustic bass traps is their size and the mounting process. Just like the Broadway Max option above, these are flat wooden panels. Depending on the layout of your studio space as well as the size of it, you may have a hard time fitting these panels in the corners of your room. 

At the end of the day, these bass traps are good performers and they don’t break the bank. So, if you’re looking for an alternative to foam bass traps, then these bass panels are a solid choice.


ATS Acoustics Corner Bass Trap

WELL-ROUNDED
9.3/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Treatment Type: Bass Traps — Number of Panels: 1 — Coverage: 24” x 13” x 48” — Construction: 100% Jute Burlap, Plywood

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Easy to set up

+ Great performance

+ Great build quality

Reasons To Avoid:

- Slightly bulky

9.3out of 10

Materials9.2
Installation9.3
Sound Diffusion9.5

Here we have another broadband absorber bass panel, but instead of a flat panel, it’s specifically shaped for the corners of your room. This bass panel from ATS Acoustics is a solid performer with an NRC rating of 1.0 and it comes in various colors to suit your needs.

The panel itself measures at 24” x 13” x 48” and it has 2-way functionality. Underneath the fabric wrap is a thin membrane that’s designed to reflect high frequency sound waves. Beyond that is a large amount of air-space that converts low frequencies into heat, which in turn tames them.

This bass trap is somewhat of a no-frills option. Unlike the flat panels above, this triangular block is easy to place in any corner of your studio. On top of that, the performance speaks for itself. Overall, you’re getting an easy to use bass trap that will do the job it’s meant to do.

The only downside to this bass panel is it’s bulkiness. As I said, mounting is a breeze, but the sheer size and weight of this product makes it hard to move around. The good thing is that once you get it to where it needs to be, you likely won’t have to maneuver it much after that.

Lastly, keep in mind that this bass trap is sold individually, so the price-tag for 4 total traps begins to add up quickly. That being said, the performance and design elements of this bass trap is noteworthy and it’s sure to improve the sound quality in your studio exponentially.


Acoustimac Bass Trap

UNIQUE PICK
9.2/10Studio Frequencies Score

Features & Specs:

Treatment Type: Bass Traps — Number of Panels: 1 — Coverage: 4’ x 2’ x 4” — Construction: Plywood

Reasons To Buy: 

+ Quite affordable

+ Very easy to install

+ Provides great absorption

Reasons To Avoid:

- Once again, a little bulky

9.2out of 10

Materials9.1
Installation9.2
Sound Diffusion9.4

Last but not least we have a unique bass trap option from Acoustimac. It features a trapezoidal shape with a sturdy plywood frame (except for the backing). This bass trap is a top-notch performer as well with an NRC rating of 0.95.

The sound absorption performance of this option is two-fold. Firstly, the entire bass trap is wrapped in Acoustimac’s Trademark DMD Acoustically Transparent Fabric. Secondly, the innards of the bass panel is filled with 6 pounds of Rockwool Insulation. Both of these materials work in conjunction with each other to absorb low frequency sound waves.

This bass trap and the Primacoustic Broadway Max take a different approach to absorbing low frequencies, and both do the job in magnificent fashion. In terms of mounting and placement, this bass panel makes life exceedingly simple, assuming the corners of your studio space are the proper shape. 

Although it’s fairly lightweight, this XL bass trap is a little bulky. The measurements are 4’ x 2’ x 4” and are quite awkward to maneuver. 

This bass trap option is meant for those of you that are looking for something different. There are numerous fabric colors to choose from as well so you can choose the right bass trap for your taste. Each bass trap is sold individually, so keep that in mind when pricing things out.


Conclusion

When taking the first steps in acoustic treatment, it’s hard not to consider the importance of taming those low-end frequencies. The sound waves created from rumbling bass sounds are wild and can create a slew of problems in your mixes.

Thankfully there are modern tools like bass traps to help you eradicate problems with bass. In this list, we covered everything you need to know about bass traps as well as my top choices. 

In my opinion, the clear winner on the list of best bass traps are the Auralex Acoustics LENRD foam bass traps. Their performance sets the bar very high among other foam bass trap options and their simple design makes them perfect for any studio setup.

With that, there are plenty of positives to be found in every option on the list. You have the ability to pick and choose a set of bass traps that are just right for you and your studio.

My only goal here is to give you the blueprint. I hope this article has provided you with some helpful information at the very least. As always, feel free to reach out with any questions you may have.

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Jeremy Bongiorno
I have been a musician and producer for over 15 years. My goal is to provide reliable, honest information and hopefully help to improve the quality of life in your studio.

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